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Is Texas about to execute for murder a man who killed no one?

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WASHINGTON - Jeffery Wood did not fire the gun that killed a Texas store clerk during a robbery gone wrong, nor did he even witness the shooting. But that didn't stop the most active death penalty state from scheduling his execution next week.
 
On the morning of January 2, 1996, Wood was sitting in a pickup truck outside the convenience store at a gas station in the city of Kerrville while his friend Daniel Reneau went inside to rob a safe.
 
Reneau had planned to stage an unarmed robbery before escaping into the hills with Wood's help. But the plan went awry when Reneau shot the store employee in the head after he refused to comply.
 
Hearing the gun go off, Wood rushed into the store to find a blood-soaked scene. He helped Reneau remove a video surveillance recorder before the two men fled, taking the safe and a cash box.
 
They were arrested the following day, quickly identified by witnesses.
 
Wood, who turns 43 on Friday, was sentenced to death under Texas's so-called law of parties, under which anyone involved in a criminal plot resulting in death is equally responsible, regardless of actual involvement or intent.
 
Prosecutors have argued that Wood could have anticipated that a murder would take place.
 
But activists, along with Wood's attorneys, are fighting to halt the execution or at least obtain a reprieve.
 
Reneau was put to death in 2002.
 
But even in Texas -- which executes far more inmates than the other 30 states that exercise capital punishment -- Wood's case is an outlier.
 
"I have never seen an execution in the United States with this low of a level of culpability as Mr Wood has," his defense attorney Kate Black told AFP.
 
"I think that this case is a really strong example of the problem with the law of parties and I think that the (Texas) Court of Criminal Appeals will take that very seriously."
 
She claims that Wood, who is said to have the IQ of a child, was unaware that Reneau -- whom he had met just two months earlier -- would carry a firearm into the convenience store.
 
Wood's family and activists have worked hard to stop the lethal injection set to take place on August 24.
 
"Jeffery Wood only has one child and that is me!!!" his daughter Paige wrote on a website supporting her father.
 
"I have been deprived because of somebody else's crime. Should I continue to be punished?" she added.
 
"Please do not kill him... He did not kill anybody. He is a kind, gentle man and I need him! If you kill him... you are killing me!!!!!!!"
 
Several dozen evangelical leaders have also written to Texas Governor Greg Abbott demanding clemency.
 
 
What do you guys think?  Should he be killed or not?

 

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the felony murder statute says that if some one dies as a result of a felony all of those comiting the felony are equally guilty of murder. I say kill him so the next thug thinks twice before agreeing to be a get away driver.

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the felony murder statute says that if some one dies as a result of a felony all of those comiting the felony are equally guilty of murder. I say kill him so the next thug thinks twice before agreeing to be a get away driver.

yup 100%. These punishments are also supposed to be deterrents. If the guy would have tried to help the clerk and not continued with the robbery that might be different but he didnt.
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Well looks like he has been spared:

 

AUSTIN, Texas -- The Texas Court of Criminal Appeals on Friday halted an execution planned for next week of a man convicted as an accomplice to a murder he did not commit in a case that raised questions about how the state applies the death penalty.
 
Jeffery Wood, 43, was scheduled to be executed on August 24 by lethal injection. He was convicted of taking part in a 1996 convenience store robbery during which clerk Kriss Keeran was fatally shot.
 
In its decision, the appeals court asked a lower court to review his sentence and claims from Wood's lawyer that it was obtained in violation of due process because it was based on false testimony and false scientific evidence.
 
Wood's layer questioned a witness for the prosecution, forensic psychiatrist Dr. James Grigson, who told a court in the 1990s Wood would commit future acts of violence and was a threat to society.
 
Grigson, nicknamed "Dr. Death" for his willingness to testify against people facing the death penalty, was expelled from the Texas Society of Psychiatric Physicians and the American Psychiatric Association for ethical violations: making diagnoses of capital murder defendants without first examining them.
 
"The court did the right thing by staying Mr. Wood’s execution and authorizing his claims related to Dr. Grigson’s false testimony during the sentencing phase to be considered on the merits," said Jared Tyler, Wood's lawyer.
 
Wood was unarmed in a vehicle outside the store when it was robbed. Prosecutors have said Wood knew the clerk might be shot. Wood's lawyers said he was unaware that a robbery was underway.
 
Wood's roommate at the time, Daniel Reneau, was convicted of pulling the trigger and executed on June 13, 2002.
 
"I am not aware of a case where a person has been executed with so minimal culpability and with such little participation in the event," Tyler said in an interview.
 
Under Texas' "Law of Parties," a person can be charged with capital murder even if the offense is committed by someone else.
 
After he heard a shot, Wood entered the store to help Reneau steal a cash box, safe and security video system.
 
Ten people have been executed as accessories to felony murder since the United States reinstated the death penalty in 1976, according to the Death Penalty Information Center, which monitors capital punishment.
 
Five have been in Texas, which has executed more people than any state since the death penalty was reinstated.
 

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  A good one. Guilt by association. Life sentences for all you users of certain services in the PI. Big men all going to kill the guy. WAWAWAWA

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  A good one. Guilt by association. Life sentences for all you users of certain services in the PI. Big men all going to kill the guy. WAWAWAWA

:hmmm:  Would say the following insinuates a bit more than "guilt by association".  :butt-dance:  :bum-2122:

 

"After he heard a shot, Wood entered the store to help Reneau steal a cash box, safe and security video system."

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:hmmm:  Would say the following insinuates a bit more than "guilt by association".  :butt-dance:  :bum-2122:

 

"After he heard a shot, Wood entered the store to help Reneau steal a cash box, safe and security video system."

  What do you think?

 

  They all say they would KILL the guy for disobeying the law. 

 

  Now you now if the law said ................... Would you kill the guy because>>>>>>  ? 

 

  Just wondering. 

 

  You everyone here going to KILL the guy. Just wonder?

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  What do you think?

 

  They all say they would KILL the guy for disobeying the law. 

 

  Now you now if the law said ................... Would you kill the guy because>>>>>>  ? 

 

  Just wondering. 

 

  You everyone here going to KILL the guy. Just wonder?

No.

As this did not occur in a personal way to me/mine, if possible I would turn him in for trial and let the law take it's course.

But IMO he is for sure culpable based on his actions.

 

"Culpability generally implies that an act performed is wrong but does not involve any evil intent by the wrong doer. The connotation of the term is fault rather than malice or a guilty purpose. It has limited significance in Criminal Law except incases of reckless homicidein which a person acts negligently or demonstrates a reckless disregard for life, 

which results in another person's death."

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If I had to judge it I would look strongly at intent. In this case he intended to go through with the robbery without a care in the world. Shoulda lit him up like a lite bulb

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If I had to judge it I would look strongly at intent. In this case he intended to go through with the robbery without a care in the world. Shoulda lit him up like a lite bulb

 

A long damn time ago.

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WASHINGTON - Jeffery Wood did not fire the gun that killed a Texas store clerk during a robbery gone wrong, nor did he even witness the shooting.
 
On the morning of January 2, 1996, Wood was sitting in a pickup truck outside the convenience store at a gas station in the city of Kerrville while his friend Daniel Reneau went inside to rob a safe.
 
Reneau had planned to stage an unarmed robbery before escaping into the hills with Wood's help. But the plan went awry when Reneau shot the store employee in the head after he refused to comply.
 
Hearing the gun go off, Wood rushed into the store to find a blood-soaked scene. He helped Reneau remove a video surveillance recorder before the two men fled, taking the safe and a cash box.
 
 
 
Wood, who turns 43 on Friday, was sentenced to death under Texas's so-called law of parties, under which anyone involved in a criminal plot resulting in death is equally responsible, regardless of actual involvement or intent.
 
Prosecutors have argued that Wood could have anticipated that a murder would take place.
 
I find this a bit far-fetched. What is this...a kangaroo court?  Could have? He could have been born a girl too, if genetics provided the help.
 
 

I'm going to go against the grain of most comments. "Gee...that's unusual" I hear some mutter.  :lol:

 

In the majority of western courts his involvement in the murder was only "after the fact". 

 

He is guilty of armed robbery by his involvement being the wheel-guy and removing items fro the premises .

 

I would imagine in MOST western courts he would be convicted and sentenced for armed robbery BUT in Texas!

 

 "Under Texas' "Law of Parties," a person can be charged with capital murder even if the offense is committed by someone else."

 

 

That's the kicker right there. 

 

By Texas law he is up for the noose and that is their right to enforce it

 

I hate crime and criminals but judging from the info provided this seems just a tad harsh, coming from a state of the leaders of the free world, but hey...maybe the deterrent works sometimes. :unsure: 

 

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